N.C.A.A.’s Defeat in California Shows Limits of a Besieged Juggernaut

The word went out minutes into last Wednesday’s meeting of California State trustees: The university had asked Gov. Gavin Newsom to veto a bill to let student-athletes seek money beyond the costs of attendance.

But few, if any, of the university leaders knew that Newsom had already decided to sign the measure and push the state into a confrontation over the economics of college sports.

Even if the National Collegiate Athletic Association ultimately prevails in the courts or through other means, it must reckon more immediately with a question whose answer could reverberate from coast to coast: How could some of the mightiest brands in American athletics, backed by some of the most powerful, politically connected institutions in California, suffer such a stunning setback in a statehouse?

“It was always going to get out,” said State Senator Scott Wilk, a Republican who is vice chairman of California’s Senate Education Committee. “But by the margins it got out, it was impressive. It was that perfect storm.”

Indeed, the final votes looked like lopsided football shutouts: Every legislator who cast a vote backed the measure to upend the model of amateur sports. Not one publicly sided with the wishes of the state’s universities or the top leaders of college athletics.

COLLEGE ATHLETES
Read more about the California law, including questions and answers about its implications.

Interviews with the governor, lawmakers and other people familiar with the workings of the California Capitol suggested the N.C.A.A. and the universities were undone by a blend of forces, including an uneven lobbying effort and shrewd work by the bill’s lead sponsor. There was also sustained hostility toward the N.C.A.A., which is based in Indianapolis, as a distant juggernaut; deep skepticism that the association was willing to make consequential changes to its longstanding rules; and a governor, himself a onetime baseball player at Santa Clara, who had pushed for changes in college sports.

One danger for the long besieged but freshly staggered N.C.A.A. is that California’s move could prove to be just the leading edge of legislative efforts around the country to reshape the model of athletes as amateurs, an idea that has dominated for generations as the foundation for building college sports into an industry worth billions of dollars. In recent weeks, lawmakers in other states have voiced support for ideas that sound much like the ones that gained consensus in Sacramento, and legislation is formally pending in some legislatures.

The N.C.A.A., which has often worked through legal and public relations battles with only limited modifications to its rules, could halt that momentum among lawmakers by winning a court victory in California. In the meantime, though, it is not clear whether or how the N.C.A.A. might change its political strategy, which in California largely relied on member institutions and at least two letters from association leaders that mirrored long-repeated talking points and, state officials said, did little or nothing to advance their cause.

The N.C.A.A. said in a statement on Monday that it “agrees changes are needed” to its rules about endorsements. It asserted, though, that it — not lawmakers — should be in charge of crafting new, nationwide rules. It warned that it was “clear that a patchwork of different laws from different states will make unattainable the goal of providing a fair and level playing field” (an argument it echoed in its so far unsuccessful push for federal instead of state regulation of sports betting).

Multiple California universities and their allies — which together spent more than $500,000 lobbying state legislators on an array of issues this year — did not respond to messages or declined requests for interviews about what transpired in Sacramento after Senate Bill 206 was introduced in February.

ImageSouthern California against Stanford last month. 

CreditMarcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

But the governor and Democratic and Republican lawmakers depicted the N.C.A.A. as politically impotent in California, the nation’s most populous state, and its universities as often distracted or resigned in the months leading up to the bill’s signing. Worse yet, they said, the N.C.A.A. and the universities sent erratic, sometimes conflicting messages about the legislation’s strengths, weaknesses and potential consequences.

“They kept changing their argument,” said State Senator Nancy Skinner, a Democrat who was the bill’s architect. But officials recalled one familiar and repeated plea: that California should give a previously announced N.C.A.A. committee time to come up with its own proposals, which are expected to be announced by late October.

Newsom, in an interview with The New York Times before he signed the legislation, said he had considered the group’s talks to be a bargaining chip. By his account, his office sought a private preview of the group’s tentative ideas. Had those possible proposals been convincing, he said, he might have been willing to derail, even by veto, the bill that is now law.

“They said, ‘We don’t have enough time to do that,’” Newsom recalled, “which said everything I needed to know about how sincere they are, and how far they’re willing to go.”

In a statement to The Times, the N.C.A.A. said it “offered to share the working group’s report when finished” and noted that it did not “have final information to share because the working group’s efforts are ongoing.” The association said, though, it had told California officials about the committee’s “current progress.”

Newsom said that other efforts to influence him had been similarly lackluster.

The University of California, which legislators said had seemed more focused on defeating a measure related to its work force, “didn’t say one word to me,” the governor recounted. A meeting with Stanford’s president, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, proved unpersuasive. And, according to the governor, the N.C.A.A. enlisted Timothy P. White, the California State University chancellor, as an intermediary to make its case.

The exchange, which the California State system declined to discuss, yielded no breakthroughs for the universities.

“He said, ‘I get it — I respect your point of view, they have a different point of view, so be it,’” Newsom said. “We didn’t have to indulge in flights of fancy and overly indulging ourselves with arguments that all of us are very familiar with.”

Indeed, the bill’s opponents faced a Capitol where views had hardened quickly, especially after the N.C.A.A.’s president, Mark Emmert, warned in June that California universities could be punished if the bill became law.

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CreditMatt York/Associated Press

“This is one of those issues that is nonpartisan,” said Skinner, whose bill drew support from Republicans in part because they saw a reliance on the markets to resolve what they perceived as a stark inequity.

“They exploit young people to their detriment for a profit, and it’s offensive,” Wilk, a former trustee at a community college, said of the N.C.A.A.

Years of public polling that showed rising support for compensating college athletes for their talents did not go unnoticed in Sacramento. Still, it was not until the final debate in the State Senate, lawmakers said, that the prospect of unanimous chambers became reality.

Senator Brian Jones, a Republican from San Diego County who said he had not been aggressively lobbied either way, said he arrived on the Senate floor expecting to oppose the bill. The debate, though, led him to reconsider his thinking, as did a series of pointed queries from one of his children, a community college volleyball player.

“He was just asking questions, he wasn’t advocating one way or the other,” Jones said. “As I had to answer his questions, I kind of had to come up with answers that made sense. I just worked myself into supporting it.”

There are other political perils on the horizon for the N.C.A.A. In New York, a state senator has filed legislation that effectively mirrors the California law and adds an expensive twist: a requirement that colleges pay 15 percent of the money earned from sports ticket sales to student-athletes.

On Monday, the day Newsom announced his move in California, legislators in Florida and Illinois filed bills of their own. Federal lawmakers, as well as officials in Colorado, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Washington State, have also signaled unease with the N.C.A.A.’s way of doing business. Even in states where college sports are prized passions, the association and its policies have gradually grown more alarming.

“I think you could very well see a groundswell in statehouses across the country against the N.C.A.A.,” said Trey Lamar, a state representative in Mississippi who once filed a bill to limit how the association conducts investigations in the state.

“They just flat-out overstep their bounds in so many different areas,” said Lamar, who was a running back at Mississippi. “They’ve gotten too big for their britches, and they need to come back to the table.”

After Newsom’s decision became public on Monday morning, the N.C.A.A. chose not to repeat its threat that universities there could be barred from competition. California’s major universities seemed to adopt a more conciliatory approach, hoping that state officials might reconsider the law’s provisions.

And at the University of California, Los Angeles, Chip Kelly, one of the nation’s highest paid college football coaches, said he saw the law as “progress.”

“The N.C.A.A.,” he said, “will have to make their adjustment.”

Lasker Awards Honor Advances in Modern Immunology

Since 1945, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation has recognized scientists and physicians who have contributed to fundamental biological discoveries, clinical research and improvements in public health.

This year, the Lasker Awards were given to two researchers who discovered key cells of the immune system, a team that engineered the first antibody for breast cancer treatment and a nonprofit that helps get vaccines to the world’s poorest children.

The awards, which were announced Tuesday and will be presented in Manhattan on Sept. 20, carry a prize of $250,000 in each of three categories. They can be a sign of future accolades as well: Eighty-eight Lasker laureates have gone on to receive the Nobel Prize.

Dr. Max D. Cooper and Dr. Jacques Miller, working independently but building on one another’s findings, pioneered an understanding of how the body fights off germs, identifying two distinct classes of lymphocytes, or white blood cells — B cells and T cells. The two researchers received the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, which is given to scientists who exemplify the additive nature of research.

When Dr. Miller began studying lymphocytic leukemia at the University of London in the 1950s, scientists had a basic grasp of the adaptive immune system. They knew that the immune system had an ability to “remember” specific pathogens and abnormal cells, and that it could enlist antibodies or live cells to attack the invaders. It was known that the spleen and lymphoid tissues played an important role in clearing out disease and rejecting transplanted tissue. But the role of the thymus was unclear, even though it contained a high number of lymphocytes.

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CreditLasker Foundation, via Associated Press

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CreditCameron Wells/Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, via Associated Press

Dr. Miller discovered that removing the thymus from newborn mice caused the animals to develop diarrhea; they also lacked strong antibody responses to infection and failed to reject skin grafts. Clearly, removing the thymus was crippling immune activities.

In subsequent studies, Dr. Miller showed that the thymus was essential for replenishing T-lymphocytes, or T cells, in adult mice.

Across the Atlantic, Dr. Cooper, then a pediatrician at the University of Minnesota and now a professor at the Emory University School of Medicine, had noticed that some inherited immune disorders in children seemed to affect two separate pathways of the immune system. His attention was drawn to studies in chickens that pointed to a possible explanation.

Chickens have a thymus and an additional lymphoid organ called the bursa of Fabricius. Dr. Cooper discovered that in newly hatched chickens, lymphocytes are generated in the liver and bone marrow, while some mature in the thymus and other lymphocytes mature in the bursa. In mammals, these B cells simply reside in the bone marrow and they were the ones that spit out antibodies when activated by T cells. There wasn’t just one set of immune cells that carried out all disease-fighting tasks in the body, but rather two types of lymphocytes with separate jobs.

“These studies told us that almost everything we were thinking about in immunology had to be revised,” Dr. Cooper said. This finding set the stage for several other important discoveries regarding immune deficiencies, treating autoimmune disorders and developing new cancer therapies.

The combined efforts of Dr. H. Michael Shepard and Dr. Axel Ullrich, who were at Genentech when they did their research, and Dr. Dennis J. Slamon, an oncologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, resulted in the creation of Herceptin, the first monoclonal antibody therapy for breast cancer. They are the recipients of the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award.

Monoclonal antibodies are proteins produced by B cells that bind to specific invader organisms and abnormal cells. They help the immune system identify and remove abnormal cells, including cancerous ones. In the case of Herceptin, the antibody binds to a protein called HER2 on the surface of breast cancer cells.

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CreditLasker Foundation, via Associated Press

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CreditAxel Griesch Fotografie/Lasker Foundation, via Associated Press

In 1985, Dr. Ullrich and his colleagues at Genentech first found a gene that drove the growth of human cells and named it HER2. Two other research groups showed that the gene was amplified in malignancies from a human breast and a salivary gland. This news encouraged Dr. Slamon to look through his own library of tumor samples at U.C.L.A. to see if any of those cells bore similar genetic markers.

To his surprise, almost 30 percent of the 189 breast cancer samples he looked at had multiple copies of the HER2 gene. “There were way too many copies,” Dr. Slamon said.

Analysis of health records showed that women who carried several copies of HER2 relapsed more quickly and died sooner than women whose tumors contained only one copy.

Scientists reasoned that if overexpression of HER2 caused tumor growth, blocking expression of the gene might help stop the spread of the cancer. So Dr. Ullrich and Dr. Shephard started developing a compound that would bind to the part of the HER2 protein that was exposed on the surface of cells.

They developed an antibody that, once bound to the HER2 receptors, stopped the cancer from proliferating and made the cells more susceptible to the immune system’s own disease-fighting compounds.

“It was kind of a double whammy for the tumor cell,” Dr. Shephard said.

After animal studies at Genentech yielded positive results, Dr. Shepherd and Dr. Ullrich teamed with Dr. Slamon to conduct clinical trials at U.C.L.A. They found that when they coupled the antibody with chemotherapy, the treatment stalled the progression of breast cancer associated with HER2 and extended survival longer than chemotherapy alone.

ImageDr. Dennis J. Slamon, an oncologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, found that many samples of breast-cancer tissue carried multiple copies of the HER2 gene.

CreditLasker Foundation, via Associated Press

“We had been giving women a one-size-fits-all treatment,” Dr. Slamon said. “But with the Herceptin antibody, we were finally able to tailor a therapy that completely changed patients’ lives. Those women went from having the worst survival rates to now having the best outcomes among breast cancer patients.”

In 1998, Herceptin was approved by the Food and Drug Administration and became part of the standard of care for HER2-positive breast cancers. More than 2.3 million people have been treated with it to date. “It’s hard to believe the kind of impact it has had,” Dr. Shephard said.

ImageVolunteers providing vaccinations in Haiti as part of the GAVI project, which has helped vaccinate more than 760 million children by negotiating lower prices with manufacturers.

CreditEvelyn Hockstein/Gavi, via Associated Press

The nonprofit GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, was started in 2000 by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and provides access to childhood vaccines around the world. A public-private partnership, the alliance helps negotiate vaccine prices with manufacturers to allow developing countries to purchase them at cheaper rates. The program has helped strengthen several of the world’s poorest countries’ health systems and substantially increased childhood vaccine coverage.

The nonprofit prices vaccines on a sliding scale. The lowest-income countries pay about 20 cents per dose for each vaccine; as their gross national income increases, they are asked to slowly take on a larger share of the cost.

“The idea behind GAVI was to step in and guarantee a marketplace by consolidating demand from different countries and lowering the risks and costs for manufacturers,” said Seth Berkley, the alliance’s chief executive.

The strategy has paid off. GAVI has helped vaccinate more than 760 million children and save more than 13 million lives in 73 countries, according to Dr. Berkley. Several countries have been able to establish and maintain effective immunization programs. Some have become successful enough that they have been weaned off GAVI’s plan.

The alliance continues to improve access to vaccines by training health care workers, developing ways to store heat-sensitive vaccines in communities without electricity, and educating people about the value of immunization.

The impact goes beyond the children who have been immunized. “If a child does not get vaccinated and they get sick, not only are they affected, but their parents or older siblings also have to take time off from work or school and spend money taking care of them,” Dr. Berkley said. By improving access to vaccinations, GAVI helps children and parents flourish, which indirectly helps the economies of their countries.

The alliance is being awarded the 2019 Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award for its work.

“I look forward to telling all of the people working with GAVI across the world that they’ve been so honored by this award,” Dr. Berkley said. “I hope this will make them work even harder on the tasks that we have in front of us, because we’re not done yet.”

California Tests a Digital ‘Fire Alarm’ for Mental Distress

Last winter, several dozen people who were struggling with suicidal urges and bouts of intense emotion opened their lives to a company called Mindstrong, in what has become a closely watched experiment in Silicon Valley.

Mindstrong, a venture co-founded by a former director of the National Institute of Mental Health, promised something that no drug or talk therapy can provide: an early-warning system that would flag the user when an emotional crisis seemed imminent — a personal, digital “fire alarm.”

For the past year, California state and county mental health officials, along with patient representatives, have met regularly with Mindstrong and another company, 7 Cups, to test smartphone apps for people receiving care through the state’s public mental health system. Officials from 13 counties and two cities are involved, and the apps are already available to the public.

The new users, most of whom have a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder, receive treatment through the Los Angeles County mental health network, and were among the first test subjects in this collaboration. They allowed Mindstrong to digitally install an alternate keyboard on their smartphones, embedded in the app, and to monitor their moment-to-moment screen activity.

“People with borderline have a very difficult time identifying when distress is very high,” said Lynn McFarr, director of the cognitive and dialectical behavior therapy clinic at Harbour U.C.L.A. Medical Center, which provides care for people in the Los Angeles County system. “If we can show them, in this biofeedback fashion, that they went off the rails yesterday, say, after they got into a fight with a co-worker, then they’d be able to anticipate that emotion and target it with the skills they’ve learned.”

The potential for digital technology to transform mental health care is enormous, and some 10,000 apps now crowd the market, each promising to soothe one psychological symptom or another. Smartphones allow near continuous monitoring of people with diagnoses such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, disorders for which few new treatments are available. But there has been little research to demonstrate whether such digital supports are effective.

California’s collaboration with Silicon Valley is an attempt to change that: in effect, enlisting some of the state’s most privileged residents to help some of its least. California has set aside taxpayer money to pull it off, more than $100 million over five years, which is a portion of Proposition 30, a tax increase on millionaires approved in 2012. If Big Data can help manage persistent mental distress, the path forward is likely to run through the Golden State.

But if early signs are any indication, the road will be slow and winding, pitted with questions about effectiveness, privacy and user appeal. At least for now, California’s effort to jump-start medicine’s digital future is running into some of the same issues that have dogged old-fashioned drug trials: recruiting problems, questions about informed consent, and the reality that, no matter the treatment, some people won’t “tolerate” it well, and quit.

“We need to understand both the cool and the creepy of tech,” said Keris Myrick, chief of peer services for Los Angeles County, who has been deeply involved in the collaboration. Ideally, she said, the apps could give people personalized tools to manage their distress and take pressure off the mental health system. But using them means sharing personal data with private companies, and any “fire alarm” has the potential to trigger anxiety, as well as blunt it. “We want to make sure people have the information to use the apps safely, that they have some digital literacy, and that their privacy is protected,” Ms. Myrick said.

The effort began in earnest last summer, when state officials, after a competitive bidding process, selected two companies to participate. One, Mindstrong, was founded by Dr. Paul Dagum, a computer scientist and surgeon; Dr. Rick Klausner; and Dr. Thomas R. Insel, a psychiatrist and neuroscientist who led the mental health team at Verily, a division of Alphabet Inc., the parent company of Google, from 2015 to 2017, after leaving the N.I.M.H., where he was the director for more than a decade.

“It’s been a little rough in the beginning, I have to say, and it may take a couple of years,” Dr. Insel said. “The program may have to fail at first.” Dr. Insel was recently appointed by Gov. Gavin Newsome as special adviser on the state’s mental health system — an unpaid, informal role without fiscal or regulatory authority. Dr. Insel retains his position as president of Mindstrong.

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Dr. Thomas Insel, Mindstrong’s co-founder and president.CreditLexey Swall for The New York Times

California’s other partner company, 7 Cups, was founded by Glen Moriarty, a psychologist, and its original team of therapists included Dr. Insel’s daughter (who recently left the team). 7 Cups is a digital mental health network: Clients in distress can chat, by text, with a company-trained “listener” who judges the severity of the problem and then, if needed, connects the person to a 7 Cups therapist. The company has signed on nearly 340,000 listeners in 189 countries, providing support in 140 languages. The service has reached 40 million people, the company said, about 0.5 percent of whom have needed referral.

The companies gained the opportunity to refine their products and potentially win the endorsement of California, as well as to incorporate a wealth of new patient data. Therapists and app users gained a chance to collaborate with Silicon Valley engineers to develop a valuable product for managing persistent mental distress.

“We’re doing something that hasn’t been done before, having consumers work directly with app developers,” said Kelechi Ubozoh, the peer and community engagement manager at the California Mental Health Services Authority, the state agency that chose the two apps and is coordinating the effort through the counties. “Part of the challenge is that these are different cultures that do not speak the same language all the time. It’s a big learning process.”

The rationale behind the Mindstrong app, in particular, provides a glimpse into how engineers are thinking about leveraging smartphone data to manage mental crises.

For most people, phone use tends to be fairly steady from day to day. With a week’s worth of data, Mindstrong’s algorithms can establish a person’s normal, or baseline, activity across a number of measures, including how frequently the phone is used and how quickly the person types, Dr. Insel said. Mindstrong and other tech companies that track phone usage call this average daily data set a “digital phenotype,” in a phrase borrowed from genetics.

If several measures begin to stray wildly from average, Mindstrong’s app triggers a message to the user. It takes the company about 24 hours to register a disrupted routine. The app also summarizes usage in graph form, so users can view trends over days or weeks.

“We do see it as like a fire alarm,” Dr. Insel said. “We want that alarm to go off when there’s a fire, and not when there’s only smoke. We’re working that out as we go.”

The app also includes a daily diary function: a digital card that users fill out each day, noting events, work stress, moods and quality of sleep, among other things.

“I like the diary card,” said Skyy Brewer, 30, a licensed barber in Los Angeles, who has used the diary since December to manage symptoms of depression and anxiety. “At therapy, you can go through the cards for the week and see the good days and bad ones, and figure out why your moods were off.”

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Ms. Brewer on the Mindstrong app. Only a few dozen people, all in Los Angeles County, have the technology so far.CreditJenna Schoenefeld for The New York Times

Between Mindstrong and 7 Cups, Californians in the state’s public medical system could, in theory, have both an early warning system and quick access to appropriate services.

But the 7 Cups program, which started a year ago, has been delayed by the state, because of an internal state financial review and concerns about some of the company’s network of listeners. According to California officials, some listeners were having inappropriate text-chat conversations with clients, engaging with them and becoming too personal, violating the company’s rules; the issue is being addressed, state officials said.

“We use a series of techniques and programs to identify, quantify, rehabilitate, block, or ban harmful language and/or harmful individuals,” said the company’s founder and C.E.O., Glen Moriarty, by email. He added, “We take matters of confidentiality, privacy, safety and all forms of harassment very seriously.”

As for the Mindstrong app, only Los Angeles County has distributed the technology, to the few dozen people who had keyboards installed last winter. Already, about half of them have stopped using the keyboard function. Some lost interest; others had trouble adapting to the new keyboards (which work better on Android phones than iPhones). A number of users decided they liked the daily diary feature, without the rest.

“The counties are spending money on this program, saying, ‘Here, this is great, we’re giving you a Fitbit,’ and we discovered that many of our people didn’t quite understand it,” said Dawniell A. Zavala, general counsel and associate director of Mental Health America of Northern California, a patient self-advocacy group. “And they didn’t explain the possible downsides of handing over so much personal data.”

Any app maker is likely to need extensive data on thousands of users to begin to adapt its product to the many permutations and combinations of mental disorders, and to the idiosyncratic ways those are expressed in an individual’s daily behavior. And access to patients’ medical records has run into resistance in California.

“We have said no — no access to electronic medical records for Los Angeles County,” Ms. Myrick said.

It is not clear whether other counties are handing over those records and, if so, whether they have obtained patients’ consent.

In an age of hacking and data breaches, tech companies that acquire both medical and monitoring data present real risks to patient confidentiality. “If we’re excited about the potential of data, we should be equally worried about the risks, and those seem to be evolving faster than the scientific benefit,” said Dr. John Torous, director of the division of digital psychiatry at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

“There may be guarantees the companies make about not sharing data, but if the company is sold to another company, that data goes with it,” he said. “A lot of apps have that clause buried in 13 pages in mouse print.”

App developers may yet transform mental health care. But the story so far suggests that they won’t be able to program their way out of the hard, incremental work of testing new treatments.

“The thing about California, it has a huge number of people in the public system,” Dr. Insel said. “At least it’s willing to ask: ‘Why isn’t this working? Why aren’t counties working with this amazing tech sector?’ And then do something about it.”

More Than 700 at 2 California Universities Under Quarantine Amid Measles Outbreak

More than 700 students and staff members at two California universities were under quarantine on Friday — an increase of about 400 from the day before — as officials continued steps to curb the potential spread of measles after an outbreak was declared in Los Angeles County.

The two universities — the University of California, Los Angeles, and California State University, Los Angeles — have been working with county health officials to identify and contact students and employees who may have been exposed to measles this month.

Those at risk of having contracted measles were given health officer orders — legal orders issued by county officials — to stay home and avoid contact with others as much as possible.

Measles is an extremely contagious virus that can cause serious respiratory symptoms, rash and fever. In some cases, especially in babies and young children, the consequences can be severe.

As of Thursday, the two universities had reported a total of 280 students and faculty members under quarantine.

In updates on Friday, that number had been revised to more than 700, with the increase coming at California State-Los Angeles.

That university reported that 106 staff members and 550 students were under quarantine orders. That was a change from the 127 staff members and 71 students reported on Thursday.

The revision in numbers came because “people who were potentially exposed have been coming to our Student Health Center in stages since Thursday morning to be screened,” Robert Lopez, a spokesman, said.

“Some were cleared immediately,” he said. “Others were told they were under quarantine.”

As of Friday afternoon, 110 students and 21 staff members had been cleared, he said. It was not clear whether those people were ever under a quarantine, Mr. Lopez said.

U.C.L.A. said in a statement on Friday that one student remained under quarantine and that less than 50 were self-isolating in off-campus residences. That total was down from 76 quarantined students on Thursday.

In a statement on Friday, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health described the number of health officer orders for quarantine as “dynamic.”

The department said it lifts a quarantine order as soon as documents are provided showing that a person has been fully immunized against measles or has a lab test that verifies immunity.

The quarantine period for the potential exposure at U.C.L.A. ends on Tuesday, and at California State-Los Angeles on Thursday.

At U.C.L.A., a student who had contracted measles attended classes in two university buildings on three days while contagious, Chancellor Gene D. Block said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Public Health Department believes that additional measles exposures may have occurred this month at Los Angeles International Airport and at several restaurants near Glendale.

A single case of the measles can quickly spiral into an outbreak, especially because people might not know they have the illness for several weeks before they begin to show symptoms.

Los Angeles is the latest metropolitan area to be hit by measles, as part of a national surge in cases. On Wednesday, federal health officials said the number of measles cases in the United States had risen to 695, the highest annual number recorded since the disease was declared “eliminated” in the country in 2000.

The virus mostly has affected families that do not vaccinate their children, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has blamed “organizations that are deliberately targeting these communities with inaccurate and misleading information about vaccines.”

Measles Outbreak Prompts Quarantines at U.C.L.A. and California State-Los Angeles

More than 200 university students and employees in Los Angeles were given quarantine orders on Wednesday and Thursday, just days after a measles outbreak was declared in Los Angeles County.

U.C.L.A. and California State University, Los Angeles, have been working with county health officials to identify and contact students and employees who may have been exposed to measles this month.

Those at risk of having contracted measles were given health officer orders — legal orders issued by county officials — to stay home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible.

At California State-Los Angeles, quarantine orders were issued on Thursday in response to potential exposures to a contagious person who visited a university library on April 11.

“At this point, 127 staff employees and 71 student employees have been sent home under quarantine orders,” the university said in an emailed statement on Thursday evening.

[Here’s everything you need to know about the measles outbreak.]

At U.C.L.A., a student who had contracted measles attended classes in two university buildings on April 2, 4 and 9 while contagious, Chancellor Gene D. Block said in a statement on Wednesday.

“Upon learning of this incident, U.C.L.A. immediately identified and notified more than 500 students, faculty and staff with whom the student may have come into contact or who may have otherwise been exposed,” Dr. Block said.

He added that most of those people were cleared, but 119 students and eight faculty members did not have the necessary medical records immediately available, so county officials issued quarantine orders on Wednesday.

“We have arranged for those who live on campus to be cared for at U.C.L.A. while they are quarantined,” the statement added.

In another statement on Thursday, the university said it had cleared 43 more students and two faculty members, reducing the number of people under quarantine there to 82.

“We expect the trend to continue as more people provide proof of immunization or are shown by tests to have immunity to measles,” the university said.

Quarantine orders can last up to 21 days from the date of possible exposure. The quarantine period for U.C.L.A. ends on April 30, and the one for California State-Los Angeles, ends on May 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health said Thursday.

The department believes additional measles exposures may have occurred this month at Los Angeles International Airport and at several restaurants near Glendale.

Measles is an extremely contagious virus that can cause serious respiratory symptoms, rash and fever. In some cases, especially in babies and young children, the consequences can be severe. Pneumonia and encephalitis — swelling of the brain — are the most common severe complications.

A single case of the measles can quickly spiral into an outbreak, especially because people might not know they have the illness for several weeks before they begin to show symptoms.

People who do contract measles often seek medical care at hospitals, where they can potentially transmit the illness to other patients, especially those with compromised immune systems. Infants typically do not receive measles vaccinations until they are about 1 year old and therefore are highly vulnerable. Some older people are also at high risk, as are patients who take medication that affects the immune system, like those being treated for arthritis.

Los Angeles is the latest metropolitan area to be hit by measles, as part of a national surge in cases. On Wednesday, federal health officials said that the number of measles cases in the United States had risen to 695, the highest annual number recorded since the disease was declared “eliminated” in the country in 2000.

The virus mostly has affected families that do not vaccinate their children, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has blamed “organizations that are deliberately targeting these communities with inaccurate and misleading information about vaccines.”

Amid Measles Outbreak, Quarantine Is Ordered at U.C.L.A. and California State-Los Angeles

More than 200 university students and employees in Los Angeles were given quarantine orders on Wednesday and Thursday, just days after a measles outbreak was declared in Los Angeles County.

U.C.L.A. and California State University, Los Angeles, have been working with county health officials to identify and contact students and employees who may have been exposed to measles this month.

Those at risk of having contracted measles were given health officer orders — legal orders issued by county officials — to stay home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible.

At California State-Los Angeles, quarantine orders were issued on Thursday in response to potential exposures to a contagious person who visited a university library on April 11.

“At this point, 127 staff employees and 71 student employees have been sent home under quarantine orders,” the university said in an emailed statement on Thursday evening.

At U.C.L.A., a student who had contracted measles attended classes in two university buildings on April 2, 4 and 9 while contagious, Chancellor Gene D. Block said in a statement on Wednesday.

“Upon learning of this incident, U.C.L.A. immediately identified and notified more than 500 students, faculty and staff with whom the student may have come into contact or who may have otherwise been exposed,” Dr. Block said.

He added that most of those people were cleared, but 119 students and eight faculty members did not have the necessary medical records immediately available, so county officials issued quarantine orders on Wednesday.

“We have arranged for those who live on campus to be cared for at U.C.L.A. while they are quarantined,” the statement added.

In another statement on Thursday, the university said it had cleared 43 more students and two faculty members, reducing the number of people under quarantine there to 82.

“We expect the trend to continue as more people provide proof of immunization or are shown by tests to have immunity to measles,” the university said.

Quarantine orders can last up to 21 days from the date of possible exposure. The quarantine period for U.C.L.A. ends on April 30, and the one for California State-Los Angeles, ends on May 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health said Thursday.

The department believes additional measles exposures may have occurred this month at Los Angeles International Airport and at several restaurants near Glendale.

Measles is an extremely contagious virus that can cause serious respiratory symptoms, rash and fever. In some cases, especially in babies and young children, the consequences can be severe. Pneumonia and encephalitis — swelling of the brain — are the most common severe complications.

A single case of the measles can quickly spiral into an outbreak, especially because people might not know they have the illness for several weeks before they begin to show symptoms.

People who do contract measles often seek medical care at hospitals, where they can potentially transmit the illness to other patients, especially those with compromised immune systems. Infants typically do not receive measles vaccinations until they are about 1 year old and therefore are highly vulnerable. Some older people are also at high risk, as are patients who take medication that affects the immune system, like those being treated for arthritis.

Los Angeles is the latest metropolitan area to be hit by measles, as part of a national surge in cases. On Wednesday, federal health officials said that the number of measles cases in the United States had risen to 695, the highest annual number recorded since the disease was declared “eliminated” in the country in 2000.

The virus mostly has affected families that do not vaccinate their children, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has blamed “organizations that are deliberately targeting these communities with inaccurate and misleading information about vaccines.”

N.C.A.A. Women’s Tournament: No. 11 Missouri State Shocks No. 3 Iowa State

Alexa Willard scored 17 points to help 11th-seeded Missouri State stun third-seeded Iowa State by 69-60 on Monday, becoming the only double-digit seed to reach this year’s Round of 16.

Abby Hipp had 11 points and Danielle Gitzen scored 10 for the Lady Bears (25-9), who will compete in a regional semifinal for the first time since the Jackie Stiles-led team in 2001. They will face either Stanford or Brigham Young in Chicago after becoming the ninth team in 10 years to reach the Round of 16 as a double-digit seed.

Iowa State (26-9) played much of the fourth quarter within a possession of the lead, only to let Missouri State answer time and time again. Sydney Manning extended the Lady Bears’ lead to 60-54 on a 3-pointer, her only field goal of the game, and Willard followed with a jumper.

Gitzen answered an empty Cyclones possession with two free throws, and Bridget Carleton threw the ball away at the 1:07 mark with Iowa State down by 65-58. The Cyclones then inexplicably failed to foul Missouri State, allowing the Lady Bears to burn nearly 30 seconds off the clock.

Carleton had 31 points in her final game to lead Iowa State, which shot a ghastly 2 of 17 on 3s and 35.6 percent overall.

Missouri State controlled the first half, jumping ahead by 33-30 at the break after Iowa State — which averages 8.9 3-pointers a game — missed its first five tries from deep. A 10-2 run to open the second half gave the Lady Bears a 43-32 lead midway through the third quarter.

Finally faced with the idea that their Cyclones were in trouble, Iowa State’s fans got into the act. The Cyclones followed, reeling off nine quick points to make it a one-possession game. But a crucial 3 by Willard helped Missouri State push its lead to 49-45 entering the final quarter.

It might have seemed as though a game-deciding run was inevitable for the Cyclones. But it was the Lady Bears, fresh off a dominant win over sixth-seeded DePaul, who took control when it mattered.

The jubilant Bears ran into the crowd to celebrate with their band after the final horn, and a few of them picked up coach Kellie Harper’s son in celebration while screaming “We’re going to Chicago!”

Juicy Landrum scored 20 points with four 3-pointers and No. 1 overall seed Baylor advanced to the Round of 16 for the 11th season in a row with a 102-63 win over California on Monday night.

The Big 12 champion Lady Bears (33-1) were trailing late in the first quarter before a 25-2 run turned their third N.C.A.A. meeting in six seasons against Cal into yet another lopsided victory. They have a 25-game winning streak.

Chloe Jackson, the first graduate transfer to play for Baylor, scored eight of her 18 points in that big run and finished 8-of-12 shooting. Freshman NaLyssa Smith had 13 points and Lauren Cox had 10 on 5-of-6 shooting.

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Michaela Onyenwere scored a career-high 30 points in U.C.L.A.’s win over Maryland on Monday.CreditPatrick Semansky/Associated Press

Michaela Onyenwere scored a career-high 30 points, Japreece Dean added 22 and U.C.L.A. squeezed past No. 3 seed Maryland, 85-80, Monday night to earn its fourth consecutive berth in the Round of 16 of the women’s N.C.A.A. tournament.

Dean, the smallest player on the court, sank two free throws with 25 seconds remaining to make it 83-79, and the Bruins held on to beat the Terrapins on their own court.

Sixth-seeded U.C.L.A. (22-12) will next face second-seeded Connecticut (33-2) on Friday in the semifinal round of the Albany region.

U.C.L.A. collected 27 offensive rebounds and finished with 27 second-chance points.

Madison Guebert scored 18 of her 20 points on 3-pointers, including two critical 3s in the fourth quarter, to lead No. 6 South Dakota State to a 75-64 win over third-seeded Syracuse on Monday night.

The victory sends the Jackrabbits (28-6) to the Round of 16 for the first time in program history. They will face No. 2 Oregon on Friday in the regional semifinals in Portland, Ore.

Guebert had 14 of her points in the second half. Myah Selland added 17 for South Dakota State, Macy Miller had 11, and Paiton Burckhard 10.

Arike Ogunbowale scored 23 points and two teammates had double-doubles as top-seeded Notre Dame ran away from No. 9 Michigan State in the first half of a 91-63 victory Monday night in the N.C.A.A. Chicago regional.

Jackie Young gave coach Muffet McGraw and the Purcell Pavilion crowd a scare when she fell hard to the floor just seconds before the end of the third quarter. She was O.K. and finished with 21 points, 11 rebounds and 7 assists for the Fighting Irish, who are in the Round of 16 for the 10th straight season. They will play No. 4 Texas A&M Saturday at Wintrust Arena in Chicago.

Brianna Turner had 14 points and 11 rebounds in becoming Notre Dame’s all-time leading rebounder, passing All-American Ruth Riley from the 2001 N.C.A.A. champions.

Kiara Leslie had 26 points and 10 rebounds, and North Carolina State pulled away to beat Kentucky, 72-57, on Monday night.

Freshman Elissa Cunane added 13 points and 15 rebounds, DD Rogers had 11 points and 11 boards, and the third-seeded Wolfpack (28-5) dominated the glass while earning their second straight trip to the Round of 16.

N.C. State — which had a 50-31 rebounding advantage — will play second-seeded Iowa (28-6) on Saturday in the semifinals of the Greensboro region.

Freshman Rhyne Howard scored 21 points and Maci Morris had 18 for the sixth-seeded Wildcats (25-8).

What’s Next in the N.C.A.A. Women’s Tournament?

The favorites have advanced to the round of 16 of the N.C.A.A. women’s basketball tournament, joined by a few surprises, namely 11th-seeded Missouri State, the only remaining double-digit seed. U.C.L.A. and South Dakota State, who were seeded sixth, also pulled off unexpected wins, beating Maryland and Syracuse on their home courts. It’s South Dakota State’s first trip to this round, which begins Friday.

“It’s a great, great, great day to be a Jackrabbit,” Coach Aaron Johnston said.

Isn’t it always?

No. 1 Baylor (33-1) vs. No. 4 South Carolina (23-9)

Baylor’s Lady Bears are the No. 1 overall seed in the tournament; expect their 25-game winning streak to continue as they march toward their first title since 2012. Baylor defeated South Carolina this season by 25 points on the road, and has wins over four teams in the round of 16: UConn, South Carolina, Arizona State and South Dakota State. A battle of the bigs featuring Baylor’s 6-foot-7 center, Kalani Brown, and Iowa’s 6-5 center, Megan Gustafson, awaits if Baylor and Iowa advance.

No. 2 Iowa (28-6) vs. No. 3 North Carolina State (28-5)

North Carolina State’s overachieving run is likely to come to an end against the surging Hawkeyes. The Wolfpack have been without four players who sustained season-ending injuries; they used only six players during crucial stretches of their second-round game against Kentucky.

Now N.C. State faces its biggest challenge, against Gustafson, who dominated the first two rounds, combining for 54 points and 35 rebounds.

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Jackie Young, right, is a junior at Notre Dame, which lost only one key contributor from last season’s national championship team.CreditRobert Franklin/Associated Press

No. 1 Notre Dame (32-3) vs. No. 4 Texas A&M (26-7)

With depth and a veteran roster, much is expected from the Irish. Notre Dame lost only one key contributor from last year’s national championship team. After hitting two buzzer-beaters in last year’s Final Four, the Notre Dame senior guard Arike Ogunbowale remains a focal point. In the first two rounds, the junior Jackie Young, the only Irish starter who is not a senior or a graduate student, has played like Notre Dame’s most valuable player.

Texas A&M’s 73-year-old coach, Gary Blair, who has taken the Aggies to the round of 16 seven times and to a national title in 2011, said his team was being overlooked. “I’m tired of people second-guessing this team,” he said. “I’m tired of people trying to figure out when I’m going to retire.”

No. 2 Stanford (30-4) vs. No. 11 Missouri State (25-9)

The Pac-12 had five of its six tournament teams advance to the round of 16, the most of any conference; Stanford is joined by Oregon State, U.C.L.A., Oregon and Arizona State. Missouri State has made a surprising run, but the program and its coaches have been here before. In 2001, Jackie Stiles led Missouri State, then named Southwest Missouri State, to the Final Four and become the career leading scorer in N.C.A.A. women’s basketball — a record that stood until 2017. Stiles is an assistant coach at her alma mater, under Kellie Harper, who won three national championships as a point guard under Pat Summitt at Tennessee.

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Guard Asia Durr has been a dynamic player for Louisville, which would face UConn on Sunday if both teams advance.CreditTimothy D. Easley/Associated Press

No. 1 Louisville (31-3) vs. No. 4 Oregon State (26-7)

The showcase for the tournament’s most electrifying player, Louisville guard Asia Durr, continues. A senior, she hopes to lead Louisville to its first national title with her crossover and fadeaway flair. With a win against Oregon State on Friday, the Cardinals could face UConn on Sunday; Louisville defeated the Huskies in January.

No. 2 Connecticut (33-2) vs. No. 6 U.C.L.A. (22-12)

UConn reached the region semifinals for the 26th consecutive year, but it did not come easy.In the second round, the Huskies’ 12-point win against Buffalo, which rallied from a 24-point deficit, was UConn’s closest game in the second round since a 2-point victory over Xavier in 1999.

U.C.L.A.’s fast-paced attack and dominant offensive rebounding will challenge the Huskies. The Bruins will try to do something the program has never done — beat UConn. The Huskies have won all five meetings. But the Bruins aren’t intimidated. “A lot of teams lose to UConn before they even start,” U.C.L.A. Coach Cori Close said. “The reality is we have a lot of confidence in what we have built and what we’ve earned.”

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From left, Satou Sabally, Sabrina Ionescu and Ruthy Hebard leaving the bench to celebrate Oregon’s first-round win.CreditChris Pietsch/Associated Press

No. 1 Mississippi State (32-2) vs. No. 5 Arizona State (22-10)

It has been a stellar year for bigs, and three of the finalists for the Lisa Leslie Award, given to the best center in the country, are still playing: Baylor’s Brown, Iowa’s Gustafson and Mississippi State’s 6-7 Teaira McCowan. McCowan comes into the round of 16 off a 30-point, 11-rebound performance against Clemson. Arizona State survived a tough test against Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., to advance.

No. 2 Oregon (31-4) vs. No. 6 South Dakota State (28-6)

No one in college basketball has mastered the triple-double the way Oregon’s Sabrina Ionescu has. In the Ducks’ second-round win against Indiana, Ionescu scored a game-high 29 points, grabbed 10 rebounds and handed out 12 assists to break her own N.C.A.A. record with the 18th triple-double of her career. With her team holding a comfortable lead over the Hoosiers, Ionescu said she missed a late 3-pointer on purpose so she could get the rebound for her eighth triple-double of the season. As great as it may be to be a Jackrabbit, South Dakota State faces a tough environment against Oregon in Portland.

The Coaches Connected to the College Admission Fraud Case

The coaches led soccer teams and sailing teams, guided water polo champions and budding volleyball stars. At least two had won N.C.A.A. championships. A third gave Michelle Obama and her daughters tennis lessons from his post at Georgetown.

The coaches charged Tuesday in a massive federal college admissions fraud scandal were some of the most prominent in their fields. But it was their apparent willingness to exploit their access to the admissions process at several exclusive universities that has them facing federal charges.

Who are they? Several had deep associations with the University of Southern California, where Donna Heinel, a senior athletic department administrator, is accused of playing a central role in the scandal. For nearly a decade, Heinel had overseen the admissions of athletes into U.S.C., working closely with several of the current and former Trojans coaches who have been indicted. She was fired Tuesday.

Here is a brief look at the current and former coaches identified by a federal complaint.

U.S.C. water polo coach

Vavic won 16 national titles at U.S.C., more than any coach in university history (10 in men’s water polo, the most recent coming in December, and six in women’s water polo). He was fired Tuesday after he was arrested in connection with the admissions scheme. He had coached the women’s team, currently ranked No. 1 and the defending national champion, since 1995 and had been the sole head coach of the men’s team since 1999. A 15-time national coach of the year, Vavic was named the Pac-12 Conference’s “coach of the century” for water polo in 2015.

According to the indictment, the co-conspirators in the admissions fraud paid $250,000 to an account that financed the U.S.C. water polo program, and in return Vavic recommended two students as recruits to the water polo team. The ringleader of the scheme, William Singer, known as Rick, is said to have paid the private school tuition for Vavic’s children through one of his company’s charitable accounts “under the guise of a fabricated scholarship.”

Former Georgetown tennis coach

According to the indictment, Ernst, known as Gordie, earned more than $2.7 million between 2012 and 2018 in payments that were falsely labeled “consulting” fees. He designated at least 12 applicants as recruits for Georgetown’s tennis teams, including some who did not play competitively. One such player, listed in the complaint, was encouraged to make playing tennis part of her application essay and claimed to be a top-50-ranking player in the U.S.T.A. for junior girls, which was not true. She was accepted at Georgetown in 2016.

A spokeswoman for Georgetown said Tuesday that the university had fired Ernst in December 2017 after an internal investigation found he had violated university rules concerning admissions. Ernst, a native of Rhode Island who is in the New England Sports Hall of Fame, was named the women’s tennis coach at the University of Rhode Island last August. The university placed him on administrative leave on Tuesday.

Wake Forest volleyball coach

Ferguson has been the women’s volleyball coach at Wake Forest since 2016. Before that, he coached the women’s team at U.S.C., winning 150 matches and leading the Trojans to three N.C.A.A. Final Fours. He was the American Volleyball Coaches Association coach of the year in 2009 and 2012. His success has not continued at Wake Forest, where he was 22-41 in his first two seasons. After Tuesday’s charges were unsealed, Wake Forest announced that he has been placed on administrative leave. Ferguson is accused of accepting $100,000 from Singer in 2017 to help Singer’s client’s daughter, who had been wait-listed by the school, gain admittance to Wake Forest as a volleyball recruit.

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CreditGerry Broome/Associated Press

U.C.L.A. men’s soccer coach

Salcedo has been U.C.L.A.’s men’s soccer coach since 2004. The Bruins are one of the nation’s top programs annually, and Salcedo has produced dozens of players who have gone on to play professional soccer. A former All-American at U.C.L.A. who had a brief career in Major League Soccer and other leagues, he has been a member of the Bruins’ soccer program as either a player, assistant coach or head coach for two decades. He is accused of helping two students gain admission to U.C.L.A. as student-athletes in exchange for $200,000. The Los Angeles Times and others reported that he had been placed on leave Tuesday.

Former U.S.C. women’s soccer coaches

Khosroshahin won a national championship in his first season with the Trojans in 2007, when he was named national coach of the year, but he was fired in 2013 after missing the N.C.A.A. tournament three years in a row. U.S.C. went 8-10-2 in his final season; he was 82-53-15 over all.

Janke joined Khosroshahin’s U.S.C. coaching staff as an assistant after playing for him in his previous job at Cal State-Fullerton. A biography of her at the Geffen Academy, a private school in Los Angeles for students in grades 6 through 12, lists her as the physical education department chair. A previous announcement hailed her hiring as the head of the school’s girls soccer program.

In the indictment, Singer is said to have contributed $350,000 a private soccer club run by Khosroshahin and Janke in exchange for their suggesting four children of Singer’s clients as recruits.

Khosroshahin and Janke was also asked to create misleading recruiting profiles and to serve references for students who were not competitive soccer players in order to help them gain admission to other colleges.

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Rudy Meredith coached Yale’s women’s soccer team for more than two decades. He resigned in November.CreditDoug Engle/Star-Banner, via Associated Press

Former Yale women’s soccer coach

A third cooperating witness in court papers was an unnamed person whose description closely matches Meredith, who served as Yale’s women’s soccer coach from 1995 through late last year. Meredith was also a participant in the scheme, according to court filings. Meredith resigned as Yale’s coach in November after a disappointing season, but also after, the authorities said Tuesday, he had accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars of payments to facilitate the admission of a non-soccer-playing soccer recruit to Yale. When he stepped down after last season, Meredith told the university that “it is time to explore new possibilities and begin a different chapter in my life.” A month later, he was elected to the Connecticut Soccer Hall of Fame.

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Stanford fired the sailing coach John Vandemoer on Tuesday. CreditScott Eisen/Getty Images

Stanford sailing coach

Vandemoer is accused of taking financial contributions to his championship-winning sailing program from an intermediary in exchange for agreeing to recommend two prospective students for admission. “Neither student came to Stanford,” Stanford said in a statement Tuesday. “However, the alleged behavior runs completely counter to Stanford’s values.” Stanford said Vandemoer had been fired.

How a Ballet Dancer Brought Balance to U.C.L.A. Gymnastics

LOS ANGELES — By now, it’s clear from a number of investigations that women’s gymnastics in the United States has been tarnished by administrators who overvalued winning and coaches who did not know where the line existed between developing gymnasts and abusing them.

And yet while much of the gymnastics world has been spinning out of control, rocked by sensational courtroom testimony and other revelations, there has been a seeming oasis tucked into the campus of U.C.L.A. Many outside the sport learned that last month when Katelyn Ohashi stunned millions of YouTube viewers with her strength, sassiness and thrilling tumbling.

To those in the know, there was little surprise that Ohashi, once not far from an Olympic berth, rediscovered her joy of gymnastics at U.C.L.A., under a coach who cannot do a single pull-up.

Valorie Kondos Field, known as Miss Val to basically everyone, is the first to admit she is not a perfect coach. She is her own sort of taskmaster, and she has a number of rules for her student-athletes. No chewing gum. No hair-ties on the wrists. But she has long presented an alternative to the often joyless training environment that has become associated with the elite levels of the sport.

In Kondos Field’s gymnastics program, there is more talk about what the young women want to do after gymnastics rather than why they did or did not make an Olympic team.

To teach gymnasts to speak up and defend a point of view, Kondos Field arranges for debates about topics, such as, “Should U.C.L.A. become a nudist campus?” The routines become a vehicle for self-expression, which is how you end up with Ohashi moonwalking her way through a floor exercise.

“I know what it’s like to have to go through puberty in a leotard,” said Kondos Field, a former professional ballerina who had little experience in gymnastics instruction when she joined the program nearly four decades ago. “I know what it’s like to have disordered eating. I know what it’s like to have to go out there by yourself.”

Kondos Field’s presence has special import right now, and not simply because another routine by a U.C.L.A. gymnast became an internet sensation. She is retiring at the end of the season.

In 2014, Kondos Field learned she had breast cancer. She let her gymnasts feel the tumor in her breast because she wanted to help them understand that a setback was not an end. During chemotherapy, she worked on reframing her circumstances and considered what else she could accomplish. She is now considered cancer-free.

In her office, guests are encouraged to get comfortable on a worn, mustard-yellow couch that once belonged to Kondos Field’s hero, the U.C.L.A. basketball coach John Wooden. The guests tell her what is going on in their lives as she sits in Wooden’s old captain’s chair. The word “gymnastics” may not even come up. That is fine.

Margzetta Frazier, a U.C.L.A. freshman and recent member of the United States national team, said Kondos Field and her staff were the only prospective collegiate coaches who spoke to her about life after gymnastics when she was being recruited.

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Kondos Field during a U.C.L.A. gymnastics competition last month. The team has won seven national titles in the last two decades.CreditBen Liebenberg/Associated Press

“They didn’t bring up the Olympics,” she said. “They were like, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’”

And where her gymnasts go, she will go, too, if necessary. At least eight gymnasts who were abused by Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, the former U.S.A. Gymnastics team doctor, later competed or worked for the U.C.L.A. team. Two of them, Madison Kocian and Kyla Ross — the only women to have won Olympic gold, world championship gold and N.C.A.A. titles — shared their stories on national television in August, with Kondos Field by their side.

Like any coach, Kondos Field may have her detractors, though they are not that easy to find. She and other N.C.A.A. gymnastics coaches adhere to methods that may be standard operational procedure in their sport — and other college sports, too — but might strike outsiders as overbearing. She monitors what the gymnasts eat for breakfast and how much they sleep. Those who break too many rules may be suspended from the team.

After the 2016 season, she railed against her team’s conditioning.

“I am not degrading you,” she recalled telling the gymnasts. “One reason why we’re not scoring higher is we’re not able to do better gymnastics because of our physical fitness.”

They won a national championship two years later.

Ohashi, who as a young teenager suffered from an eating disorder and was compared to “a bird that was too fat to lift itself off the ground,” called Kondos Field “my mentor, my mom, my sister, my best friend.’’

“She’s literally everything to me,’’ she added.

The team, like its counterparts at many other universities, participates in a grueling 14-meet schedule. Its scores are sometimes a point of contention. Some contend the U.C.L.A. gymnasts get a “leotard bonus” — a higher mark — simply because of the program’s status and its seven national championships since 1997. Others argue that Kondos Field’s intricate choreography can blind the judges to flaws.

Still, U.C.L.A. executes some of the most difficult and artistic gymnastics in the N.C.A.A.

Kondos Field, 59, was never a competitive gymnast. In a recent Instagram post, she hung from a set of chalky uneven bars, her feet cautiously tapping a mat as her Pilates instructor tried to encourage her to use her lat muscles when attempting that elusive pull-up.

Knowing where she needs help, Kondos Field relies on her assistants, including the Olympic gold medalist Jordyn Wieber, to refine her athletes’ technical skills.

Kondos Field grew up in Sacramento and first set foot in a gym in 1976. The instructor did not need a dance instructor, but he hired her to play piano for the floor exercises.

“I couldn’t keep my big mouth shut as I’m playing,’’ she said. “I’m telling them: ‘Point your feet! Get your legs straight! Get your head up!’’’

U.C.L.A. eventually hired her as a choreographer in 1982. After the 1990 season, the senior associate athletic director, Judith Holland, dismissed the coach and decided that Kondos Field was the best person to take on the job and reinvent the gymnastics program, which had yet to win a national championship.

“I remember laughing out loud and saying, ‘You know I don’t know the first thing about gymnastics,’” Kondos Field recalled. “That came after I was catatonic for about 30 seconds.”

At first, she became a stereotype of a coach, acting as if she were always right. She continually demanded more from her athletes, but the team floundered and she planned to resign. Then she happened upon some of Wooden’s teachings. His words resonated, just as they do with nearly every coach who works at U.C.L.A., where, nearly a decade after he died, he remains the Wizard of Westwood.

“Success is a peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming,” Wooden once wrote. That mind-set became the ruling principle of Kondos Field’s program. Its effect is easy to detect.

“I’m willing to go out of my comfort zone,” said Gracie Kramer, who joined the team as a walk-on.

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Coach Val giving advice to one of her gymnasts.CreditKayla Reefer for The New York Times

And Frazier, the U.C.L.A. freshman and national team member, has become increasingly open to discussing the pressures that her sport places on teenage girls.

“Elite gymnastics is messed up,’’ Frazier said. “I don’t care how many people come at me for that. Because they know it’s true. It’s decades of evil. And I feel bad saying that, because I love gymnastics and I’ve had some great coaches.”

Kondos Field does not disagree. She is appreciative when her gymnasts speak their minds. Sometimes, she said, when they arrive on campus, they think her basic questions are “a test” and they will get in trouble for answering them honestly.

Kocian, the Olympic gold medalist, agrees that happens. “I had always followed that elite mind-set of this is what you’re doing, you don’t have much of a say,” she said.

But Kondos Field does not want it to be that way. And she has developed a cult following among gymnastics fans. At a meet last month against Arizona State, they looped a concourse, waiting for Kondos Field to sign copies of her book, “Life Is Short, Don’t Wait to Dance.” Some own “Miss Val” PopSockets. One Twitter user even made a version of “The Last Supper,” with Kondos Field as Jesus and gymnasts as disciples.

The last meets are approaching, too, the last opportunities for Kondos Field, usually in inches-high heels, to lead the student section in mimicking the most memorable movements on the floor.

“I’m not retiring because I don’t like my job or I’m bored,” she said as she rattled off her goals: speaking engagements, promoting her book, maybe creating a Broadway musical. “But ever since I got cancer, I realized that we all have an expiration date. I just don’t know when mine is.”